Sunday, September 04, 2005

(With all due respect to the victims of Hurricane Katrina), why are they called "hurricanes" in the Atlantic and "typhoons" in the Pacific? They are same types of storms.

8 comments:

Snake said...

I don't even want to hazard a guess. But I'll check to see if you get any answers.

Anonymous said...

Both are tropical cyclones but 'hurricane' is a word of Spanish origin and 'typhoon' has its roots both in Chinese and (by adoption) in Arabic. Interestingly, during WWII the British RAF used both words for types of fighter aircraft.

Rae Ann said...

anonymous beat me to it!

Astrid said...

Why make life easy when it can be complicated?

Snake said...

I knew that stuff about Spanish and Chinese and Arabic derivations; I was wrestling with something deeper.

DrMax said...

Ya gotta go with whatever names the boys in marketing say work. Something catchy, easy to remember. "Really big fricking wind and rain storm, run for your lives!" just didn't test well.

OldRoses said...

Snake, you and I seem to be thinking along the same lines. I was already aware of the derivations of the terms. My question was why use two separate terms for the same phenomena instead of one single term as Dr. Max suggested.

Dr. Max, I think you are on to something. Would an acronym (RBFWRS) work better, perhaps?

crazygramma said...

Dr. Max too funny